“…and rife is good.”

Earlier this week my girls and I played a short game called “life is good” that I discovered in Susan Kaiser Greenland’s book,  Mindful Games.   The game is played by sitting in a circle with a ball.  Each person names one thing that is bothering them then adds “…and life is good” before rolling the ball to another person in the circle.   As we played the game, we highlighted small things that bothered us during the day.  I mentioned things like  “a messy house” or “feeling cranky because I was tired.”  My older daughter’s list included the fact that “she doesn’t love the bees in the backyard.”  My 2-year old also chimed in with:

“I ruv my friends, but sometimes I don’t ruv my friends, but I ruv my friends…and rife is good.”  Read more

“May you be happy. May you be strong. May you be peaceful. May you be loved.”  

My daughter’s amazing kindergarten teacher seamlessly integrated mindfulness into their everyday curriculum, and had a wonderful ritual to start each day.  Every morning the class would sit together and first take an anchor breath together and then several “in-out” breaths.  Once the class centered a bit, she would ask each student to pair up with another child, and facing each other, they would take turns sending kind thoughts to one another and then to themselves:  May you be happy. May you be strong. May you be peaceful. May you be loved.”    Read more

Everyone is Special in Their Own Way

This week’s kindness project was inspired by my daughter’s softball coach.  At the end of the season, during their pizza party, her coach gave each softball player a certificate for hard work and sportsmanship.  She called each girl up to present the certificate and as she did, she commented on the special attributes that player brought to the team. Whether they were the “life of the party” or “worked hard,” each player was celebrated for their unique contributions to the team.  After being honored, each girl sat back down with a big smile on their face.  What I really loved about this celebration was that it was less about the team’s achievement and all about how special and valuable each child was to the team. Read more

Starting the Diversity Dialogue with our Littles

At this past weekend’s Mindful Littles diversity event, we gathered as  a community of families to talk about diversity and celebrate what makes each of our families special.   By amazing coincidence, our event happened to fall on World’s Cultural Diversity Day.  This day was started after the September 11th attacks, and the United Nations designated May 21st as Diversity Day in order to advocate for more dialogue on the topic of cultural diversity. Read more

Honoring the Mothers Who Are No Longer With Us

There is no other word quite like mother.  For many, like myself, the word represents someone who is the purest form of selfless devotion, someone who epitomizes unconditional love and compassion.  I am truly grateful that I have had almost 40 years of life experiencing this love from my “Ma.”   But I am aware of what a blessing this is. Read more

Rock-Paper-Scissors and more…

One night a few weeks ago when the girls were taking a bath, they got into a tiff over a bath toy.  My 2-year old wanted the toy that my older daughter was playing with.  My older daughter immediately responded by asking her sister to play “Rock-Paper-Scissors” to see who could have the toy, which was a pleasant surprise.  My toddler is a little too young to play the game, which my kindergartner realized and said “You can be scissors and I’ll be paper, so that you can have the toy this time.” Read more

“Yes. That was me with The. flowers…”

This week’s kindness project was a bit organic as is typical of many of our projects.  The girls and I were baking some banana bread at home and decided to make an extra loaf to share with our neighbors.  Specifically, there are a couple of neighbors who have had a harder time recently so we decided to share some treats with them to hopefully cheer them up a bit. Read more